Monday, July 13, 2009

"Claire"

6 x 6"
oil on masonite
nfs

Occasionally, I play with this technique - flooding a white gessoed board with a rich wash of brown - then subtracting from that layer. It's completely opposite of applying color onto color. It's fascinating what occurs - each and every stroke will matter - and there's no planning the outcome. It is a great exercise in getting values right, but more important, it teaches you how to handle the brush with direct, intentional strokes. It's great fun too.



11 comments:

Janie Blagg said...

Love your work! Very impressionistic.

RnB said...

That sounds like a really interesting technique. I've always been very additive with color in my own paintings that I've done. The last few major exercises I've done were not using white or black to tint or shade any of my colors, and thinking even further back, working in monochrome. I think that I just might try doing a painting using the technique you've described.

I just found your blog a few days ago but you've come up with such a great idea for a themed blog.

BardSpeaks said...

Amazing!

AutumnLeaves said...

I love that sepia effect too, Karin. You did a lovely job with Claire's portrait. I am simply in awe of your talent! And I am wrestling with that human figure in the DSfDF challenge. I seem to elongate his face with every effort and he loses some of his bulk. Sigh...I keep on trying, though I may end up with no submission. Thanks for those practice challenges. They are wonderful for someone like me.

Ann Rogers said...

What a great exercise, thanks for sharing. Perfect for those of us who "overwork an area" because the first stroke wasn't right.

Bobbi Heath said...

Beautifully done! The deliberate strokes are one of the things I admire most about your work. Can't wait to try the exercise.

Debbie said...

I love the freedom of your brush strokes!

LSaeta said...

Wow. What a graet exercise. You are very inspiring for all of us artists out there!

Books,Coffee,etc.... said...

Hi! Karin Jurick,
Thank-goodness! you, played with that technique...because you have created a very painterly, impressionistic painting.
Very nice work!
Thanks, for sharing!
DeeDee ;-D

edmarion said...

beautifully done, Karin

adebanji said...

I just love the effect of this portrait!