Friday, November 27, 2020

My 2021 Calendar

8 Now Available

My 2021 Calendars are here!

 This mini wall calendar measures 8-1/2" by 13" opened up, featuring 12 months of color reproductions of my paintings done in 2020.  

 
 

 
The price for one calendar is $22 plus Priority Mail shipping and state sales tax.  To preview this calendar, click here.  
 
To purchase your calendar, click here.


Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Thanksgiving

I know.

I haven't posted in days.  I've painted two pieces and in a blink of an eye, they both sold.  I've just been lucky.  And grateful.

Here are the two.

"Happy Dance" that features the joyous Dance by Henri Matisse.

 

10 x 10"
oil on panel
sold


"Kiss Her" featuring Gustav Klimt's iconic The Kiss.
 

9 x 12"
oil on panel
sold


~  There are brighter days ahead, my friends.  Stay safe, stay healthy, wear a mask and be kind to one another.  And have a lovely Thanksgiving.
 
 




Friday, November 6, 2020

"Hair Solutions"

 

 
6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


In Washington DC, you can see many paintings by the famous portrait painter Gilbert Stuart.  Stuart's most recognized is of George Washington which you'll find in the National Portrait Gallery among the Presidents - the one featured above, Catherine Brass Yates (Mrs. Richard Yates) shares a room in the National Gallery of Art with other notable Americans.

In 1793, Stuart had just returned to America from a long stretch in England where he enjoyed popularity and recognition as being one of the lead portrait artists.  And a different America it was.  Catherine Yates is thought of as one of Gilbert's most famous paintings both for the artistic masterpiece that it is and, what is known as a symbol of this young country's rectitude - meaning moral righteousness.  Personally, I always get a kick out of looking at this portrait every time I'm visiting the National Gallery.

~  Keep wearing your mask and stay healthy.



Thursday, October 22, 2020

"Spooked"

 

 
6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


When October comes around, I always think of the Wyeth family - as in N. C., his son Andrew and his son Jamie.  The enthusiasm for pumpkins and Halloween started with N. C., with costumes and Jack-O'Lanterns playing a large part of the celebrations.  All three of the artists painted many versions of pumpkins placed around the home, in vines, lit at night and then there's Pumpkinhead, painted by Jamie Wyeth, a self-portrait done in 1972.

The best way to explain how this painting came to be is by Jamie himself:

“I had been elected to the National Academy of Design in New York, and one of the requirements was that you give a portrait, a self-portrait of yourself. Well, I didn’t want to do myself in a self-portrait, but I love pumpkins. It’s the sinisterness, the Halloween I’ve always loved. It’s a little bit edgy. So I did it and of course they were furious and rejected it.”
 
Imagine Jamie Wyeth's submission to a panel of stuffy art professors.  That's funny in and of itself.  It speaks to him messaging the art world's long standing rejection of the Wyeths being 'real artists' and more illustrators and saying 'take that'.  
 
Pumpkinhead has been and always will be one of my very favorite paintings by the great Jamie Wyeth.
 



Sunday, October 18, 2020

"Milkin' It"

 

 
8 x 12"
oil on panel
sold


The next time you're lucky enough to stand in front of an original painting by Johannes Vermeer, imagine yourself, in 1657 in the Netherlands.  You're standing behind the artist as he's painting in his studio on the top floor of a nice townhouse and the only lighting is the blue daylight coming through a window and the candles lighting his palette and canvas.  Their maid, an older, sturdier woman poses beside the window, seemingly unaware of the viewer, pouring milk in a ceramic bowl with stale bread used as props on the table.  Nothing fancy.  Just a domestic woman doing her everyday chores.

The Milkmaid is one of Vermeer's most-famous paintings - one of a few that survived a fire. And lucky for us.  Vermeer appreciated light like no other artist of his time.  The woman against the white wall, the glimmer of white on the stream of milk being poured, the left side of her face and clothing lit as the rest recedes into shadows.  And his details.  Right down to the nails in the wall and seeds on the loaf of bread.  Just wow.

The Milkmaid has traveled all over the globe and is currently back home at the Rijkmuseum in Amsterdam.  Thanks go to Cindy Pronk, a photographer who lives in Holland and offered her original photo for a painting reference during this time when traveling and museum visits have been put on hold. I really appreciate the generosity of others.

Please click here for a larger view.



Friday, October 9, 2020

"Good Bones"

 

 
8 x 10"
oil on panel
sold


I have this thing for morning glories and moonflowers.  The simple pleasure of being greeted in the morning with the purple and blue blooms that weren't there the day before and won't be there the next day - it reminds you to live in the moment.  The same with moonflowers - big, white blooms that open around dusk, just for that one night. 

So naturally, Georgia O'Keeffe's Ram's Head, Blue Morning Glory ranks up there as a personal favorite.
O'Keeffe painted this during an important transition of her own life.  Described as marking the death of one aspect of her life as an artist and a woman and the blooming of even better things.  She had left New York City, possibly ending her career as an artist.  The morning glory symbolizes how much she flourished in her new home - isolated in the desert opposed to living in one of the country's largest cities.  She developed a deep respect for the land and the Hopi culture in many of her paintings during those years.

From the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Please click here for a larger view.

~ Stay safe, stay healthy and wear your mask and VOTE.



Monday, September 28, 2020

" Connoisseur"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


I had started a smaller study for Penguin Zen and decided to finish it because you have to find joy wherever you can.  Painting an animal does it for me.

Someone let me know the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri also invited some penguins as guests to browse their galleries during their shutdown, like the Art Institute of Chicago had.  The most charming result is these penguins stopped and seemingly took in many of the works of art, much like this little guy.  Claude Monet's Water Lilies spoke to him.  Or her.



Saturday, September 26, 2020

"Penguin Zen"

 
9 x 12"
oil on panel
sold
 
 
I needed to paint something fun and recently read about Chicago's Shedd Aquarium's penguins being guests at the Art Institute of Chicago while the museum was closed to the public.  Here's one of the guests admiring Claude Monet's Irises, 1914/17 seemingly recognizing familiar elements.
 
Soon after I posted my painting on social media, Shedd Aquarium responded how much they liked it and even have a penguin named Iris!
 
Please click here for a larger view.


Thursday, September 17, 2020

"Face the Music"

 

 
6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold
 
 
Personally, I have a love/hate for Picasso's art.  I favor most of his Cubist style, top of the list being Guernica and the featured painting Three Musicians.  They are jigsaw-puzzle-like, flat planes of solid colors, overlapping like cutout paper making sense in the end.  

Three Musicians is a complicated composition, so much so, this study may have convinced me to not tackle a larger painting.  Don't know yet.  I find Picasso's painting just plain fun.  You see a recurring figures, a Harlequin and a masked Pierrot - both familiar characters in the old Italian theater stories. You see sheet music on a stand, a clarinet and guitar and even a dog's paws stretched out on the bottom left corner.  

When I paint these reproductions of artworks, there's always a deeper understanding of each piece - a valuable lesson every time.  

From the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

~ Stay healthy, stay safe and wear your mask.


Friday, September 11, 2020

"Pull Up a Chair"

 

 
9 x 12"
oil on panel
sold
 
 
Two of our country's best art museums are in Washington DC and often overlooked.  The Smithsonian American Art Museum, conveniently connected to the National Portrait Gallery, which is located on F Street, not in the National Mall with all the other museums - where I want to stand and scream "go a few blocks down to the best two museums in the city!".

American art and American artists are my jam.  Top five personal favorites include Edward Hopper. This gem I featured is People in the Sun.  A perfect description, on the museum's website,  says this painting "suggests a crowd of tourists who feel obliged to take in a famous scenic view, but do so with little pleasure."  That makes me laugh.  Hopper traveled the American West, taking in motel scenes, landscapes, lonely tourists and a whole different light and brought it back to New York City.  He didn't paint out West, he found himself unable to deal with what he called the harsh light and monumental landscapes.  Many of his paintings are a result of sketches and memories, including People in the Sun.

Please click here for a larger view.

Stay healthy, stay safe and wear your mask.
 


Thursday, September 3, 2020

"Freeze"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


I've written about Andy Warhol, the famous Pop artist, and his fascination with idols like Marilyn Monroe, Jackie O, Mao Zedong and yes, Elvis Presley.  With movie stars, he was enamored with the oversize posters promoting the films, selling these celebrities like Campbell Soup labels sold soup. Warhol produced multiple silkscreens of Elvis, in many different ways - this one being two color silkscreens next to two grey-scale screens titled Elvis I & II.

Speaking of the King of Rock n' Roll, the image Warhol used was from the western Flaming Star that came out in December 1960.  His first "serious actor" role was void of any musical numbers.  A month, a month before, G.I. Blues came out and diehard Elvis fans LOVED it.  Plenty of music in that film satisfied audiences but the comparison was inevitable when Flaming Star premiered - proving his fans didn't share his dream of becoming a serious actor.  Another western was in the works, but the Colonel made sure he wouldn't attempt that again.



Wednesday, August 26, 2020

"Threat Assessment"

10 x 10"
oil on panel
sold


With my own traveling restricted most of this year and museums around the country closed until further notice, there have been many generous friends on Instagram who've allowed me to use their photos as a painting reference, including the one used for this painting.  Thanks to Jelmer, who photographed in Amsterdam's Rijksmuseum.

The little girl is viewing the very dramatic The Threatened Swan by Jan Asselijn - and the story behind, what was the Rijksmuseum's first acquisition, is so interesting.  Asselijn painted this piece in 1650 - at first glance it's a furious swan defending her nest against the approaching dog on the bottom left (hidden behind the girl's head).  A closer look reveals three inscriptions - under the swan, translated, The Grand Pensionary, on one of the swan's eggs, translated, Holland and above the dog's head, translated, The Enemy of the State.

At the time the museum acquired the painting, it was understood as alluding to the famous Dutch statesman, Johan de Witt, who was the foreign policy guy also in charge of the commercial interests of Holland.  He strove for peace with England, a competitor and enemy of the province at the time.  De Witt's family symbol was also a swan, so it seemed obvious - the English dog threatening the swan symbolizing the enemy of the state.  You get the picture.  

But.... there's a big but - years later, someone realized the artist in fact died before De Witt even started his political career and he probably had no intention of his painting being propaganda.  It was then the museum discovered the inscriptions were added later but by whom remains a great mystery.

The painting on the girl's left is The Cannon Shot by Willem van de Velde the Younger.

Please click here for a larger view.

~ Stay safe. Stay healthy. Wear a mask.


Monday, August 17, 2020

"Taking a Shine to Magritte"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


Brett's comment to my finished painting was "The shine on the apple looks like the shine on the man's bald head."  Such a great observation and it didn't occur to me. 

Rene Magritte's The Son of Man is widely known and endlessly satirized.  Magritte painted this surrealist self-portrait in 1964.  It's simplistic.  It's ambiguous.  Left to interpretation like most Surrealism-style works of art.  

Rene Magritte started his artistic career as an Impressionist but his wit took over, wanting to paint more thought-provoking subject matters.  His first gallery exhibition in 1927 left the art critics puzzled and expressing a thumbs-down review so he moved to Paris meeting up with fellow surrealist artist - Joan Miro and Salvador Dali notably.  Although he tried, the critics in Paris weren't much different so he moved back to Brussels jumping back on the Impressionist bandwagon for a time in 1930.  It wasn't until the late 40's did Magritte revert back to Surrealism and the time, after the war, critics and patrons seemed to click with his work for the first time.

The Son of Man features a bowler hat, a prop that appears constantly in Magritte's work.  They say the hat hinted at his political leaning to the Communist party.  It's the shiny green apple, hiding most of Magritte's face, that's most curious.  There is a theory it refers to Christianity, as a symbol of the common man surrendering to temptation like Eve in the Garden of Eden.  Another interpretation is the apple simply hides a man's true self from society.  That is Surrealism.  We see what we want to see.

~ Stay safe. Stay healthy. Wear a mask.


Tuesday, August 11, 2020

"An Open Book"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


During most of the 1700's the artist Jean-Honore Fragonard was a painting rock star.  The Rococo era, by definition, was characterized by "hedonistic freedom and a pursuit of all things aesthetically pleasing" and Fragonard was all about that.  His fantasy female figures are the epitome of femininity - calm, docile, frilly collars and dresses, playfully tossing their children in the air - you get the picture.  And that was the rage in the 18th century, with respect to how women were portrayed on canvas.

Although Jean-Honore Fragonard's style fell out of favor as the 1800's began, Young Girl Reading was and still is one of Fragonard's most popular images.  I can attest to that because I framed multiple prints of it during my picture-framing years.  It's a classic.

From the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC.



Friday, August 7, 2020

"Good Boy"

9 x 12"
oil on panel
sold


Jamie Wyeth, the son of the great artist Andrew Wyeth and the grandson of the illustrator and artist N. C. Wyeth is a giant to me.  He remains tireless and prolific - my favorites are portraits of Andy Warhol and the Soviet dancer Rudolph Nureyev, his gigantic portraits of pigs and any painting with a dog.

Meet Kleberg, Jamie Wyeth's yellow lab.  As the story goes, told by Jamie in a Saturday Evening Post article, one day, Kleberg got a little too close to his easel and he spontaneously painted a black circle around Kleberg's eye to make him look like Petey from the Little Rascals.  Kleberg seemed to enjoy the extra attention so Jamie switched to a black mustache dye that lasted longer, remarking "Kleberg would come to me when it needed touching up."  And that circle remained for the rest of Kleberg's years.

The painting Kleberg includes a Victorian skep or beehive, woven from straw - essentially a basket placed upside-down - used to house bees for some 2000 years. The books on the shelf reflect Jamie's favorites, including Treasure Island, illustrated by N. C. Wyeth, Howard Pyle's illustrated Pyle's Book of Pirates and a biography of John F. Kennedy, who's portrait Jamie was commissioned to paint.

Kleberg can be viewed in the Denver Art Museum.

Please click here for a larger view.



Saturday, July 25, 2020

"Drink Up"

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


I have a great admiration for the artist Winslow Homer.  He was self-taught.  He was an illustrator.  His mother was a watercolor painter and was his first teacher and nurtured his artistic abilities at a young age.  His father, on the other hand, sold his hardware store when Winslow was a teenager and took off for the California gold rush - which failed - then went to Europe to raise cash for a get-rich-quick scheme that failed.

Homer took on an apprenticeship for a lithographer at the age of 19, then joined the staff of Harper's Weekly that lasted over 20 years.  He was sent to the front lines of the American Civil War to document the battle scenes and soldier life, which didn't get much attention but it sharpened his skills.  When he returned to his normal life, he concentrated on paintings of rural life, scenes of childhood and young women - gaining great popularity with his images of nostalgia and simpler times.

Homer had this thing about portraying women and now-freed black men and women in a more dignified and strong way.  He corrected the disparaging images that publications like Harper's Weekly had printed for years in that respect.  

Homer's A Temperance Meeting is a perfect example, painted in 1874, hangs in the Philadelphia Museum of Art.  Their description of this work is so well written - "Homer's painting cleverly refers to the rising American temperance movement, a crusade against drinking alcohol, by depicting a stout milkmaid pausing while a farmhand drinks from her ladle. Swaying under the weight of her pail and squinting into the sun, she presents the ideal of natural womanhood. Her powerful presence, marked by broad shoulders, muscular arms, and sunburned skin, counters the farmhand's relaxed stance and shaded face, visually reversing traditional gender roles. Far from flirting, the two figures awkwardly avoid each other's gaze, modeling rural wholesomeness and rectitude."

~ Stay healthy and wear your mask.
 


Thursday, July 23, 2020

"Color is the New Black"

9 x 12"
oil on panel
sold


When it comes to really feeling the joy of a painting, top of my list is dogs.  Second is featuring any painting by Wayne Thiebaud.  He is a giant in my world.

Wayne Thiebaud has painted ordinary objects - wedges of pie, lipstick, sunglasses, neck ties, cupcakes, buckets of paint, gumball machines, shoes to name a few - for decades.  What sets him apart as a painter is he takes that subject, that thing, and injects life into it - with color.  Take one shoe you see in his painting Shoe Rows.  There is, approximately, no less than 10 colors of paint in that one shoe.  The edges vibrate. The devotion to every object and shadow is admirable.

And that's why this painting was pure joy to paint.

Please click here for a larger view.


Saturday, July 18, 2020

"Mother and Child Reunion"

8 x 10"
oil on panel
sold


Well, after painting my smaller study you see on the post below, I jumped right into a larger, more-realized piece.  The Mary Cassatt painting is larger, the details are more crisp and that gives me so much more insight to her colors and edges.

Cassatt, like other artists in her time, were influenced by other cultures and their artwork.  Picasso found African masks his springboard to more geometric paintings which lead to Cubism.  Cassatt and Matisse were inspired by Japanese design and printmaking which lead to figures that appeared almost 2-dimensional or cut-outs.  They incorporated fabric patterns in backgrounds and clothing on figures, which was fairly uncommon in painting up until then.  That's why I say The Child's Bath is so quintessential Mary Cassatt.

Please click here for a larger view.


Saturday, July 11, 2020

"Mother and Child Reunion" (study)

6 x 8"
oil on panel
sold


The whole time I was painting this, Paul Simon's song was going through my head.  A mother and daughter viewing Mary Cassatt's The Child's Bath.  Quintessential Cassatt - observing the intimate relationship between mother and child, with an influence of Japanese block print and patterns on patterns.

From the Art Institute of Chicago.

~ a thank you to Stephania for the partial use of her photo.



Friday, July 3, 2020

Taz

5 x 5"
oil on panel



A gift for my neighbor on this 4th of July - the late and great Taz digging the pool.

Have a safe and happy 4th my friends.

Tuesday, June 30, 2020

"The Horror"

6-3/4 x 12"
oil on panel


My newest painting for the show Summer Duet, opening this weekend at Robert Lange Studios features one of my personal favorite paintings The Gross Clinic, by Thomas Eakins.  Inspired by a recent New York Times article, I was reminded of my last visit to the Philadelphia Museum of Art years ago.  I strolled into a quiet room, high ceiling, nobody else there.  I walked straight ahead, not sure what was in this room, turned around and there it was.  The Gross Clinic.  Nearly 8 feet high and 7 feet wide.  My mind was blown.

Thomas Eakins was 31 years old when he completed this masterpiece.  31!  He was studying art, completely enamored with the human anatomy, bound and determined to render figures in a realistic, accurate manner.  He followed the rapid advances of medicine and participated in the theater-like demonstrations of one particular physician, Dr. Samuel Gross, a man very well-known in his birthplace city of Philadelphia.  Dr. Gross served as an advisor to the US Surgeon General during the Civil War, wrote "A Manual of Military Surgery" which was the first of its kind - providing medical instructions for Union Army battlefield surgeons.  That manual was later pirated by the South and a Confederate version was released a year later.  Dr. Gross later served as the 20th president of the AMA, going on to publish many surgical text books throughout his long career.

When Eakins revealed his extraordinary painting, critics were brutal.  The New York Times art critic described it as "so dreadful that the public may be well excused if it turn away in horror." much like the only female figure in the painting to the left of Dr. Gross.  Notice no surgical masks, no scrubs, no surgical gloves - that didn't exist at the time. The patient was suffering from an infected femur bone and with no anesthesia, underwent the amputation procedure which was revolutionary and ended the butcher-surgeries performed up until then.

The ridiculous part of the initial criticism of the painting centered around the "violence" and the melodramatic woman's reaction - when in fact, it's one of the most important works of art of the 19th century.  Eakins sold it for a paltry $200 in 1876 and it hung in the medical building and later the alumni building of Thomas Jefferson University until 2006, when the University voted to sell it to the National Gallery of Art and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art for $68 million.  But that's not the end of the story.  

The sale to the two museums was deemed as a secretive act and efforts to keep the painting in Philadelphia, regarding it as an historic object, raised $30 million, with a bank agreeing to float a loan for the remainder.  Other works of art owned by the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts were thrown in as part of the final deal.

Please click here for a larger view and purchase/contact information.





Sunday, June 21, 2020

"Road Trippin'"

16 x 6-3/4"
oil on panel
sold


For the upcoming Summer Duet show opening July 3rd - a new painting featuring David Hockney's Mulholland Drive: The Road to the Studio in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.  Hockney's painting is a staggering 10' x 7' without the frame, appearing like a colorful wall mural that will take your breath away.

The British-born Hockney has lived in Los Angeles since the '60's and clearly has a deep affection for the city with many, many paintings of sunny landscapes, shimmering swimming pools and friends and lovers memorialized in his life in California.  

Mulholland Drive is a panoramic map of LA based on his daily road trip from his home in Hollywood Hills to his studio on Santa Monica Boulevard - all painted from memory in just a few weeks.  The road curves around the top of the painting, showing the movement and high-altitude of his daily trek, passing trees, power lines, houses and tennis courts.  Amazing work of art.

Please click here for a larger view.


Friday, June 12, 2020

"Cruising By"

10 x 10"
oil on panel
sold


You tend to hear more about Claude Monet or Edgar Degas or Auguste Renoir when French Impressionists are named.  The art world, for centuries, was and to a point, still is a male dominate thing.  Back in the 1800's, a daughter was veered towards domestic life or nursing - the rebels became famous writers and poets and a few became painters, like Mary Cassatt.

Cassatt was one of seven children raised in an upper class family.  Her father was a stockbroker, her mother came from money.  They raised their children to be educated with traveling abroad a part of their privileged childhood.  At a young age, she was exposed to artists in Paris and Spain, returned to America and enrolled in the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts at the age of 15, where females made up 20% of the students.  That only made Cassatt more determined to make art her career.  She went on to study in Paris under extraordinary painters but it wasn't until she was in her mid-30's when she hooked up with the Impressionists, namely Degas, who became a close friend and important influence.

Cassatt is best known for her paintings of mothers and children, including the painting on the left Boating Party, said to be inspired by Boating by Edouard Manet (on the right).  Her painting wasn't well received and she convinced her friend to buy it, where that collection was eventually bequeathed to the Metropolitan Museum in New York City.

Please click here for a larger view.


Tuesday, June 2, 2020

"There's Always Hope"

5-3/4 x 12"
oil on panel
sold


My newest painting is timely but not planned that way.  Art imitates life they say.

The Hope poster by Shepard Fairey came to represent Barack Obama's presidential campaign back in 2008 - printed as a street poster with versions stating "hope" or "change" or "progress".  The campaign initially was independent of but later gave their nod to the image and even commissioned Fairey to do official posters and T-shirts.

The following year the National Portrait Gallery in DC acquired the large, mixed-media version then things took a sour turn when it was revealed the reference photo was taken from an Associated Press image without the permission from the photographer.  Fair use of the original was fought in court and both parties settled in 2011.  Fairey got in more trouble the following year when he destroyed and fabricated documents, attempting to hide he used the AP's photo - then admitting to his wrongs, plead guilty, got 2 years probation, community service and a $25,000 fine.

Fairey had worked at redeeming himself since and, along with other artists, is responding to the death of George Floyd.  He recently said "My way of coping when too many people seem indifferent has been to make images spotlighting these issues and injustices.  I use these images to donate to organizations like Black Lives Matter, the ACLU, The Southern Poverty Law Center, the Equal Justice Initiative and #Cut50, all of which do critical work on the social justice front lines."

Please click here for a larger view.


Tuesday, May 26, 2020

"Coat Stand"

6 x 16"
oil on panel
sold


I finished this new painting last night,  Memorial Day evening.  It features a sliver of Emanuel Leutze's depiction of Washington Crossing the Delaware - a massive painting nearly 22' x 13' not including the elaborate frame.  

The story behind this famous oil - the event took place on Christmas night in 1776, Washington's aim was to attack Hessians, German auxiliaries fighting on behalf of the British, in Trenton, New Jersey during the American Revolution.  It of course depicts the future first President of America and also the future fifth President James Monroe who's holding the American flag.  

The artist Emanuel Leutze was a German who grew up in America, born 40 years after the Battle of Trenton.  He returned to Germany as an adult, where he painted this moment in history, hoping to inspire and motivate the European liberal Revolutionaries.

A few things where the artist took poetic license - the flag didn't exist until a year after the battle, the boat was more of a raft and Washington was much younger than portrayed and knew enough not to stand up in a rowboat.  Historians don't believe Monroe crossed the Delaware, although he did fight in Trenton and got a bullet in his shoulder that remained for the rest of his life.  The other occupants in the boat were from different walks of life - fur trappers, an African, a Scot, farmers and one woman who represented women who fought and died for freedom.

The painting was damaged by a fire during the first year and Leutze successfully repaired it and completed it before a German art museum acquired it.  That painting was destroyed in 1942 during a WWII bombing by British forces.  Luckily, Leutze created a copy (can you believe it?) after he finished the first one that was shipped to New York City in 1851 where it was displayed in a gallery and at the U. S. Capitol in Washington, DC.  It is now on permanent display in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

~ In the NYT obits today was the passing of John Driscoll who owned New York City's oldest art gallery, the Babcock Gallery. I was surprised to read this portion "In 2015, Dr. Driscoll arranged the purchase of one of two surviving versions of Emanuel Leutze’s “Washington Crossing the Delaware,” from 1851. A collector who had lent it to the White House for 35 years sold it to the founders of the Minnesota Marine Art Museum in Winona. It’s probably the most famous American painting west of the Hudson River,” Dr. Driscoll said when it was unveiled. “At auction, this picture would have pulled out not only art collectors but ultrapatriots who are very wealthy.”  Mr. Driscoll died of the COVID-19 virus.



Please click here for a larger view.