Friday, January 16, 2009

The Passing of an Idol

'Winter' by Andrew Wyeth

I raise my glass to one of the greatest American artists, who passed away in his sleep at the age of 91. He has been and will always be a great influence in my life.

”Oftentimes people will like a picture I paint because it’s maybe the sun hitting on the side of a window and they can enjoy it purely for itself,” Wyeth once said. “It reminds them of some afternoon. But for me, behind that picture could be a night of moonlight when I’ve been in some house in Maine, a night of some terrible tension, or I had this strange mood. Maybe it was Halloween. It’s all there, hiding behind the realistic side. I think the great weakness in most of my work is subject matter. There’s too much of it.”


Here's to a great man and a extraordinary painter.




16 comments:

Marian Fortunati said...

Beautiful words, wonderful work... what a legacy he and his family have left us!

www.MaryAnn.ca said...

I'm so sad to see him pass on. His work is amazing. He will be missed.

BTW - this is one of those moments I think I'll always remember in a "where were you when" kind of way. And through my RSS reader at that. Seems fitting that another wonderful American Artist should be the one to break the news.

Take care,
Mary Ann

Vern Schwarz said...

Here, here, Karin, a toast to the great master. His is one of my favorite books on art.

Mary Anne Cary said...

Karin,
I went to the Olsen house for an art workshop this fall, it's unbelievable what happens when you walk in that house. You truly feel transported to another time and totally surrounded by all who have passed through there. It was definitely one of the most profound experiences I have ever had and highly suggest a visit to anyone who is in the area. Besides, the beauty of the area is overwhelming. Thanks for honoring him.

John Wright Art said...

One of my favourite American painters, along with Edward Hopper and Winslow Homer. A sad day for the world of art.

Brian Kliewer said...

Wyeth influenced my work from early on. I bought "The Art of Andrew Wyeth" when I was 14. It was dogeared in no time. Eventually, I developed my own style but Andrew Wyeth was the spark for me.

I am deeply saddened by this loss but, I am so very pleased that he saw my work in person and offered high praise for it. He visited Mars Hall Gallery in Tenants Harbor, Maine several times in the last few years. I got word from the gallery that he kept going to my things in particular and exclaiming about my use of light and artistic touch, etc. I'll never forget it. Thank you, Mr. Wyeth!

muddy red shoes said...

I have just heard too, how sad but also how wonderful to have lived such a life and given so much, we share a birthday!

Katherine Tyrrell said...

Very sad indeed.

I developed one of my information sites to be about Andrew Wyeth a while back - it was absolutely fascinating finding out about him.

I also think he's one of those American artists whose work travels well across the Atlantic

Erika Nelson said...

Cheers to Andrew Wyeth! An artist not exposed to his body of work is a deprived artist! I was a profound journey!

Erika Nelson said...

Not I, but his wonderful works he dared to paint!

Edward Burton said...

A sad loss to the art world indeed - cheers to Andrew Wyeth.
I have a wonderful memory of going to see a retrospective of his work at the Boston Museum of Fine Art around 1971 when I was about 6 years old - I was impressed even back then.

adebanji said...

A man of depth and a Powerful Painter!

Pete said...

I was always a fan of his father, but only recently came to appreciate him. I just happened to be at the Chadds Ford museum when his granddaughter was giving tours. It was a wonderful experience...a sad day yesterday.

Mary Sheehan Winn said...

Absolutely, an Icon. Love his amazing, moody work.

Paintings by Irit Bourla said...

Read page 14 In Newsweek week of Jan 26th.

Maggie Mayer said...

He is one of my favorites as well. I love the amazing detail in his technique but its the subtle underlining messages that are most fascinating too me. I've often wondered how to do this in a piece without going overboard. We can speak to all people no matter their language with our work but it's too easy to say to much and lose our audience's focus. It seems like the more subtle the piece the more spirit it has and the louder it speaks. Do you know what I mean?