Wednesday, January 14, 2009

"Chin Up"

4 x 11"
oil on masonite
sold


As I'm reading my own words in that article, I realized I wasn't practicing what I preach - to not zoom in on the reference photo too much - it makes me nit-pick. And I end up drawing with the brush, rather than painting. I'm trying to hard. Time for an exercise. After going back to the other painting I was nit-picking at, it started to flow. Oh that flow.

A little girl standing before (under) Claude Monet's 'Stacks of Wheat', which hangs in the Art Institute of Chicago.




8 comments:

Erika Nelson said...

Karin I recognized the Monet even with that snippet :) So what exercise do you recommend when you start drawing with the brush? When I start drawing with the brush, or even with the charcoal pencils, it usually signals I'm way tired. I guess it's when the 3rd eye is shutting down for me heh Can't wait to see the article! This means a trip to Borders.

Anita said...

Cute picture! I have caught myself zooming in too and have decided that the only way to avoid this is to slightly blur the image and then it really makes no difference if you zoom in or not - the details have gone!

Jeffrey W. Phillips said...

I love this little girl. For me, you've captured her personality with that inward-turned right leg. Plus, the colors - simply wonderful!

Art with Liz said...

Beautiful painting - again! She is so CUTE.

Paintings by Irit Bourla said...

Simply beautiful!

Honor Martinez said...

What a lovely little girl! The pose is so typical. I too tend to get caught up with details and yesterday a comment by a fellow artist brought me up short. He said, I am painting an illusion of a tree in the background - every branch and leaf need not be detailed, in fact I'm to let the eye fill them in. I helped me tackle the trees without obsessing.

James Parker said...

Karin, I like the colors, the composition, the subject and the little girl's body language is priceless...given a choice between Monet's Haystacks and yours...yours would be hanging over my couch. I am really beginning to appreciate the freedom and flow of your style, and that's saying a bunch from a guy who counts the hairs on a beetle's belly. Great work....James

Marian Fortunati said...

Your imagination helps you seek the most darling poses from what would normally be unremarkable, you have made the scene remarkable.