Friday, April 30, 2010

Q & A Friday

These weeks just fly by, don't they? I'm working on a mini-solo show opening June 19th, at the 16 Patton Gallery in Asheville - albeit a last-minute plan - but it motivates me and that's a good thing. Three weeks from today I'll be heading to New York for the workshop, needless to say, time is of the essence. Yikes.

I'll take questions until dinner time Sunday. Ask away...... and please read the past Q&A's first, I'm getting a lot of repeat questions. Thanks.

23 comments:

mary maxam said...

What surface do you use for larger works that are not on hardboard? thanks

Karin Jurick said...

I use masonite, cut to size and surface it with gesso. Personally I detest stretched canvas.

Ann Gorbett said...

This is fun. Any quick tips or dos and don'ts you can offer on framing? Ex: proportions, colors, how to complement the piece verses overwhelm it. Thanks Karin.

Barbara said...

What are your favorite paint brushes, and how do you take care of them?

Rick Mercer Designs said...

How do you decide which colors to use when painting. I have a tendency to duplicate the colors exactly as they are in the photo, even when I'm forcing myself not to. Is there a certain mindset or plan you use when painting because you seem to nail down the perfect set of colors in every painting?

Karin Jurick said...

Do's & Don'ts of framing......
Don't use a ready-made frame unless it's the exact size you need. It looks awful otherwise. Do choose your framing/matting based on the artwork and not your couch or drapes or bedspreads or......
Lastly, never equate the $ worth of what you're framing with the cost of framing. There's absolutely no relevance to the two.

My choice brushes are inexpensive, flat, synthetic 'washer' types. I use them for about a week and toss them when they're spent.

How do I decide what colors to use? Can that be explained? My mindset is that I'm not painting the photograph, I'm painting a painting. Use the photo to get about halfway done, then put it away and let your intuition take over.

Linda said...

How did you first market your paintings? Thanks, Karin.

karenwihbey said...

Karin, Which medium do you use-turp, oil etc.- and how do you use them with your paints? Love your work! thanks, Karen

Elaine Hurst said...

I saw somewhere that you paint quite a bit on a black surface. I have done that quite a bit also, and really enjoy it. Do you ever switch it up and try other colors? Also, do you use tempered masonite, then gesso it? Do you have any other boards that you have used that your would recommend?

Karin Jurick said...

- When I started painting, I auctioned the pieces on eBay.
- I use linseed oil as a medium.
- I paint on tempered, gessoed masonite. I have used metallic grounds and various colors as grounds, I favor black. I haven't used other hardboard panels - I'm happy with Ampersand Gessoed hardboards. I trust the product.

Lesley Spanos Art said...

I marvel at the precision of your lines when you do architectural subjects. Your straight lines never dip or curve, your verticals are always 100% vertical, and your perspective is correct. Do you have any tips for drawing a straight line with a brush?

Karin Jurick said...

I work with flat brushes, so defining a straight line is a bit easier. It's a hard question to answer - I think I work in blocks of color when I'm tackling buildings, pretty loose, then closer to completion, I pay a lot of attention to tightening up the straighter edges. Maybe I'm saying to stay loose and not worry about it with most of the process, and let that be the finishing touches, with respect to getting those buildings straighter.

Kathleen Owings said...

When reading the Q & A sessions on your blog, I noticed you referenced teaching sessions online. For the life of me I now cannot relocate that comment, nor find out more about that possibility either on your blog or website. Perhaps sleep deprivation is to blame. Am I correct that you do sometimes offer online instruction and how might I keep abreast of that? Tnanks!

Karin Jurick said...

Some have suggested online teaching - I don't have that available.

Elaine Hurst said...

One more question...I noticed in one of the YouTube videos that it seemed that you work on one area at a time. Do you always do that? I haven't had a chance to look at more videos.

Karin Jurick said...

I don't always do anything really - I just find that I don't make a mess if I go left to right, so most paintings are approached that way. It depends on the subject before me.

smellyrhinostudio said...

Hi Karin, my friends and I are really enjoying learning from you!

To what action(s) do you most attribute your success selling artwork online and creating a following?

Karin Jurick said...

The following still astounds me, I don't know how that happened. Lessons learned from 30+ years in retail probably have a lot to do with getting it right. Give the buyer something worthy, stay consistent and reliable and always keep up with the business end of it. Audiences can get bored easily - knowing that, I'm constantly motivated.

tracywall said...

Hi Karin,
Thanks for offering your advice, experience and insight to our questions!

I know this is all up to each individual artist, but I'm interested in your take: I'm considering selling prints of my work. (I'm not sure if you ever sell prints of yours outside of your books.) I've always been under the impression that I shouldn't create prints of a painting until the original has already sold.

Is there a common rule of thumb regarding this? Does selling giclees decrease the value of an unsold original? Is this all in my head? :)

Thanks again for your opinion!

Karin Jurick said...

The subject of making prints available is a hard one for me to articulate - personally, I'm against it for several reasons. I feel like it launches an artist into a whole different category - I suppose that's from being a picture framer for 30+ years. I see that it makes a lot of money for the artist but it lessens the value or integrity of the artwork. I can't help it, that's how I feel.

In addition to that, it's a whole other business to manage - who will sell the prints, who will manage the quality control of the prints, who will share the revenue, etc.

The best an artist can hope for is a gallery or publisher takes the reins, but personally, I don't want someone else taking control of my images.

I want a buyer of my painting to know their acquired piece is original - one that will last for a long time. Prints, on the other hand, are subject to fading and aging - I don't care what kind of canvas, paper, ink is used. As I said, I've framed these for years.

Last but not least, the counterfeit art business is out of control and having prints available opens up the possibilities of someone out there reproducing from a reproduction. I've seen that in my frame shop for years too. I don't want any part of it.

I stress, it's a personal opinion - and with respect to the revenue that can come of offering prints - it may be easy money on the surface, but it's a headache. I'd rather paint and earn a living that way.

Terri Buchholz said...

I'm always amazed at the opacity of your colors, especially whites. I've tried multiple brands from cheaper to expensive and the "colors" of white including zinc, titanium, flake, iridescent, and radiant, but they never pop like yours. Any tips?
I should add, I'm usually pushing to get as much done in one sitting that I can since time to paint is so limited. I don't give it much dry time while I'm working on something.
Thanks Karin!

Karin Jurick said...

I do a painting in one sitting also - so I don't think that's a factor. I finally found the white that works for me, after trying a lot of brands and types. Radiant white by Gamblin is great - Titanium white by Daniel Smith is the best, in my opinion.

Karin Jurick said...

Over and out. Thank all of you who contributed this weekend.